Category

Award

SPIT STAIN GRAFFITI

Short List
ClientCANCER PATIENTS AID ASSOCIATION
ProductCANCER CHARITY
EntrantPUBLICIS AMBIENCE Mumbai, INDIA
Type of EntryCorporate or Brand Identity
CategoryEnvironmental Design
TitleSPIT STAIN GRAFFITI
Product/ServiceCANCER CHARITY
Entrant Company:PUBLICIS AMBIENCE Mumbai, INDIA
Design/Advertising Agency:PUBLICIS AMBIENCE Mumbai, INDIA
Credits
Name Company Position
Ashish Khazanchi Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) National Creative Director
Prasanna Sankhé Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) National Creative Director
Nikhil Panjwani Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) Copywriter
Mayuresh Wagle Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) Copywriter
Shantanu Suman Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) Art Director
Siddhesh Khatavkar Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) Art Director
M.s. Belliappa Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) Agency Producer
Shireesh Sabnis Publicis Ambience (a Div. Of Publicis Communications Pvt. Ltd.) Agency Producer
Ganesh Ultra Digital Studios Editor
Anita Peter Cancer Patients Aid Association Director

Brief Explanation

1. A majority of the gutkha consumers are illiterate. So the design had to be simple enough to be understood by them. 2. Many gutkha consumers were not aware that tobacco can cause cancer. 3. Thirdly, the message had to be in the right place. 4. The design also had to be feasible with a low budget.

Describe the brief from the client:

Gutkha, an indigenous form of tobacco, has become a fixture in the mouths of millions of Indians (including 5 million children). With 80,000 cases of oral cancer annually, and most users oblivious to the fatal hazards of gutkha, Cancer Patients Aid Association wanted to make people aware of the silent killer.

Description of how you arrived at the final design:

After gutkha is consumed, it is usually spat onto a wall, causing an unsightly red stain. We created graffiti around them that looked as if the gutkha user was vomiting blood (a symptom of cancer). The stark visuals were easily understood by the semi-literate users. The design was budget friendly. Half the paraphernalia (the stains) was already available for free. We distributed stencils and spray cans to art students and asked them to spread the message. Since users came anyway to spit their leftover tobacco in their habitual places, they could not escape the message.

Indication of how successful the outcome was in the market:

The visually scary images of people puking blood worked effectively in warning users that the same might happen to them if they don't stop chewing gutkha. Many uneducated Indians weren't even aware of the harmful effects as they thought chewing gutkha was like chewing candy. By spending merely Rs. 1,50,000 ($3,000), the campaign got visibility in over 18 towns across the country.Within just 2 months, over 15,00,000 users came to know about gutkha-the silent killer.